MBA Student Achieves Dream Career
MBA Student Achieves Dream Career

A Master of Business Administration is a “universal” degree, says graduate business student Nadia Syed. “An MBA can be used in any and every field, which makes you a commodity. I have seen it firsthand in my current role working in the government and have seen how beneficial it is in other fields as well, such as in health care.”

Syed will complete her MBA in May. When she entered the program, she set a goal of securing a consulting role in the health care industry. She has achieved this goal. Syed has accepted an advisory associate position with KPMG’s health care solutions team. The Lincoln, Nebraska, native will relocate to the Boston area this fall.

She will be paired with a KPMG health care sector client to work on a myriad of projects, such as conducting analytical reviews of health care data to determine if business practice change is warranted and developing dashboards to monitor the success of new initiatives. 

Heather Doering, assistant director of business career programs at Creighton’s John P. Fahey Career Center, directed Syed to KPMG. After visiting the firm’s booth at the Career Center’s virtual career fair and studying KPMG’s University Connection website, she decided to apply for the health care solutions position. 

Syed’s interest in health care dates to her childhood when she volunteered at a Lincoln hospital. She went on to major in nutrition and health sciences, earning Bachelor of Science in Education and Human Sciences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and spent two summers interning with Boston Medical Center, first as a population health intern and then as a strategy and operations intern.

These experiences, she says, confirmed that she wanted a career in health care and inspired her to earn an advanced business degree. Initially, she considered what she calls a “more clinical path in health care.” But she then realized she truly enjoyed working on health care projects – “tasks focused on enhancing patient experience, overcoming barriers to care and providing quality improvement.”

“There is so much that excites me about this opportunity,” Syed says. “I’m excited to get my foot back in the health care industry door, truly start my career, meet and collaborate with new colleagues and experience living in Boston.”

Aware of Creighton’s academic reputation, Syed knew she’d apply to the Heider College of Business’ MBA program. But what really set Creighton apart from other programs was the community. “Other programs I was considering were not as personal as Creighton,” she says. 

As a full-time analyst with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Syed knew she needed a program that was flexible so she could take classes at her own pace. Though she prefers online classes, she was still able to engage with her professors and peers and build relationships. One of the highlights of her MBA experience was participating in the Australia travel course, spending two weeks in Sydney and Melbourne to tour Australian companies and cultural sites and learn about the continent’s history and people. 

“This is an example of how I was able to mold my MBA experience as I desired,” she says.

For Syed, a Creighton education is “one-of-a-kind.” She says she always felt like her professors cared about her as an individual and appreciated their creativity in delivering the same quality education during the pandemic. And she is grateful for the hours Doering and the Career Center staff dedicated to her post-graduate employment hunt and their excitement for her when KPMG made an offer. 

“An educational community like the one at Creighton is unmatched,” Syed says.